Amy Yamamoto
A Different View

Reflections and Observations

"[Going to Honolulu during the war] was a good experience for me, you know, because otherwise, I would have ended up being in plantation and marry a plantation boy and still [be] there.

And fortunately, I think I married one of the best guys."

I really didn't go through this hardship where maybe a lot of people did. Like on the Mainland, you know, a lot of people were interned and all that. But here, the only thing that was really outstanding was that things were rationed, like food, not so much, not that bad. And other than that, I don't think - even my folks, being first generation - I don't think they felt too bad about people mishandling them or anything like that. I would say that we - at least I - went through a pretty comfortable situation.

Amy and Whitey Yamamoto, Hawaii, 2005
Amy and Whitey Yamamoto, Hawaii, 2005

[Going to Honolulu during the war] was a good experience for me, you know, because otherwise, I would have ended up being in plantation and marry a plantation boy and (chuckles) still there.

And fortunately, I think I'm married to one of the best guys.

Whitey Yamamoto, Hawaii, 2006
Whitey Yamamoto, Hawaii, 2006

Amy Yamamoto's interview courtesy of the Center for Oral History. Photographs courtesy of the Center for Oral History and Shari Tamashiro.

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